Crop Plants on Geograph

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Images also under a similar Creative Commons Licence.


Crop plants on Geograph

A large number of Geograph images depict many different crops, often incidentally as part of the landscape, and often in various stages of growth. Descriptions vary, and the crop may or may not be identified in the description. This article illustrates from Geograph images the main crop plants that may be encountered in the UK, with additional information that may be useful to users. They are arranged in groups of similar type. [the list will not be complete; please let me know of any omissions]

CEREALS, and harvest

WHEAT
SO7840 : Wheat and barley side by side by Philip Halling
If you have ever wondered what the difference is between wheat and barley, well here it is clear. Wheat is on the left and barley on the right. Barley has little spikes on the ears.
by Philip Halling

NT5982 : Awned wheat at Gleghornie by M J Richardson
Not sure which variety - it might be Evolution, LG Sundance or Soissons. Most wheat varieties do not have long awns [whiskers] but a few do.
Thanks to Bob Sunter [Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA)] this is most likely to be the cultivar Skyfall, and not one of the three I initially suggested.
by M J Richardson

TL3292 : Bearded wheat at Grange Farm by M J Richardson
Near Benwick. Most traditional wheat cultivars do not have awns or whiskers, unlike barley and rye, but some do.
by M J Richardson

NT4066 : Winter wheat at Cranstoun by M J Richardson
Not quite ready for the combine.
by M J Richardson

SP7350 : Footpath through the wheat by M J Richardson
Keep straight ahead and one will come to the path that was used to take the canal boat tug horses over the Blisworth canal tunnel, which has no towpath.
by M J Richardson


BARLEY
SO7840 : Wheat and barley side by side by Philip Halling
If you have ever wondered what the difference is between wheat and barley, well here it is clear. Wheat is on the left and barley on the right. Barley has little spikes on the ears.
by Philip Halling

NT5666 : Barley at Newlands by M J Richardson
Winter Barley, judging by its colour at this elevation in mid-July. For detail see NT5666 : Ripening barley at Newlands.
by M J Richardson

NT4527 : Barley and Oats at Philiphaugh by M J Richardson
It is not normal to grow these two cereals together, but there is too much of both here to be contamination so presumably they are being grown as mixture for feed of some sort? The barley is light green and whiskery, with flowers in two rows, and the oats darker green with individual flowers.
by M J Richardson

NT6572 : Barley at Halls by M J Richardson
With pasture and the valley of the Cauld Burn beyond.
by M J Richardson

NT6875 : Barleyscape from Doon Hill by M J Richardson
Looking south from the Historic Scotland site on Doon Hill.
by M J Richardson

SE9284 : Wild  Oat  in  a  field  of  Barley by Martin Dawes
A very clean field but as I got to the end corner wild oats were beginning to show
by Martin Dawes


OATS
SO8641 : Oats field at Earl's Croome by Philip Halling
This year this field's crop is oats, a footpath crosses this field to Earl's Croome but hasn't been cleared.
by Philip Halling

TA1874 : Clifftop oat field, north of Buckton by Christine Johnstone
Most of the cereal grown in and around the Wolds is barley or wheat, not oats.
by Christine Johnstone

SK6248 : Old fashioned harvest by Alan Murray-Rust
Oats cut by a reaper and binder have been stooked ready for later collection and threshing.
by Alan Murray-Rust
Shared Description

SE9284 : Wild  Oat  in  a  field  of  Barley by Martin Dawes
A very clean field but as I got to the end corner wild oats were beginning to show
by Martin Dawes

ST8957 : Field of oats by Doug Lee
This is a view of the oats shown in ST8957 : View towards Steeple Ashton
by Doug Lee

ST8957 : View towards Steeple Ashton by Doug Lee
The field is planted with a crop of oats
by Doug Lee

TA1318 : Oats nearly ready for harvest by Jonathan Thacker
The cultivation of oats in Lincolnshire is a fairly uncommon practice.
by Jonathan Thacker

TG0222 : Ripening oats by Evelyn Simak
Probably the oldest known oat grains, dating from about 2,000 BCE, were found in Egypt. Presumably these were weeds rather than a systematically cultivated crop. The oldest known cultivated oats were found in caves in Switzerland and are believed to date from the Bronze Age. The history of oats is obscure because there are so many different species and subspecies, which makes identification of old remains very difficult. The chief modern centre of greatest variety of forms is in Asia Minor, where most all subspecies are in contact with each other. Oats are chiefly a European and North American crop, with Russia, Canada, the United States, Finland, and Poland being the leading oat producing countries. Not a very common crop these days, oats make up about 3% of the total of cereals grown in the UK today. About half of the oat crop is milled and used for human consumption, the balance is used for animal feed.
by Evelyn Simak


MAIZE - also known as CORN by some, but corn normally refers to the principal cereal of a region, which can differ. The use of corn to refer to maize is an American usage which has become almost universal; Wheat is the 'corn' of lowland Britain, while in Scotland and upland areas 'corn' would more likely be Oats. Most of the Maize grown in Britain will be fodder varieties, rather than sweet corn.
TL7167 : Maize field on Kentford Heath by Hugh Venables
With a patch left unplanted, probably for Stone Curlews, a rare breeding bird that is present in this area.
by Hugh Venables

SO5778 : Maize field by Ian Capper
Looking over a field of maize off Clee Stanton Road, with Titterstone Clee Hill in the background.
by Ian Capper

SK6656 : Footpath through the maize-2 by Alan Murray-Rust
Dog's eye level view - compare with LinkExternal link
by Alan Murray-Rust

SK5309 : Path in Maize by Jim Barton
Approaching Bradgate Country Park through a crop of maize on the path from Anstey. On the skyline is the war memorial and the Old John Tower.
by Jim Barton


OTHER CEREALS -
RYE
NS5871 : Rye at Easter Balmuildy by M J Richardson
It was quite a surprise to see Rye being grown, but there seemed to be quite a lot of it in this area north of Glasgow.
by M J Richardson

NT3966 : Rye in flower by M J Richardson
In a strip sown at the edge of a crop of winter wheat. All grass flowers have three anthers [bottom left of the spike].
by M J Richardson

NT3966 : Rye near Cranstoun by M J Richardson
A strip of rye separating a field of wheat from a shelterbelt.
by M J Richardson


TRITICALE - A wheat/rye hybrid
SU1158 : Reaper/binder, Bottlesford by Maigheach-gheal
The earlier machines simply cut the crop and left it on the ground for gathering by hand into sheaves. By the last quarter of the nineteenth century, an effective knotting mechanism had been devised so that the machine could tie the sheaves as well. These binders, remained in common use until ultimately replaced by the combine harvester in the middle years of the twentieth century. The tractor is a Massey Harris. The crop is a wheat and rye hybrid and there were two machines working the field with a gang of men stacking the sheaves into stooks.
by Maigheach-gheal

SU1158 : Corn Stooks near Bottlesford by Maigheach-gheal
The crop is a wheat and rye hybrid called Triticale, it is being grown for thatching. In the United Kingdom, the demand for high quality cereal straw for thatching exceeds supply, Triticale is an ideal complementary crop for thatching particularly as many wheat varieties suitable for thatching will become less available in the future. Here the sheaves are stacked together to form stooks, this allows both the sun and wind to get to the stalks to dry them.
by Maigheach-gheal

SU1158 : Corn Stooks near Bottlesford by Maigheach-gheal
The crop is a wheat and rye hybrid called Triticale, it is being grown for thatching. In the United Kingdom, the demand for high quality cereal straw for thatching exceeds supply, Triticale is an ideal complementary crop for thatching particularly as many wheat varieties suitable for thatching will become less available in the future. Here the sheaves are stacked together to form stooks, this allows both the sun and wind to get to the stalks to dry them.
by Maigheach-gheal

SE2336 : How do I get down from here? by Stephen Craven
This snail must have climbed all the way up the grain stalk and onto its overhanging seed head. The grain, according to an information board, is triticale (a wheat/rye cross; a grain I had not previously heard of).
by Stephen Craven
Shared Description


SORGHUM
TM5183 : Sorghum crop on the Benacre Estate by Evelyn Simak
Sorghum is extensively grown in India, northern China, and Africa where it is the leading cereal. Agricultural experts of the European Union are presently investigating the use of agricultural land for non-food production, such as the growth of biomass crops as a source of renewable energy and renewable sources of raw materials. One of the experimentally grown crops is sorghum (both the sweet and the fibre-producing varieties). The plant has a high net assimilation rate even under high light and water stress conditions and has the potential to produce high yields in fertile soils. The partners of the European Sorghum Network are studying the production and environmental impact of sorghum under field conditions at various sites around mainly southern Europe; investigations include low input trials and studies of soil erosion, crop rotations, and balances of water, nitrogen, carbon and organic matter. The ten partners of the European Sorghum Network are based in Italy, France, Spain, Greece, Portugal and at the University of Essex in Colchester.

Benacre Estate has descended in a direct line ever since 1746. Benacre Farms Company farm approximately 2300 acres of land tenanted from the Benacre Estates Company, operating a conservation policy with a close working relationship with English Nature. The farms extend from the coast in the east to Henstead in the west and from the River Hundred in the north to Potter Bridge marshes in the south. Crops grown include wheat, barley, rye, field beans, rape, hemp, sugar beet, potatoes, carrots, parsnips and asparagus.
by Evelyn Simak


HARVEST - Straw is what is left when the grain has been harvested. Sometimes it may be chopped and ploughed back into the soil; more usually it is baled and taken away to be used as animal bedding, fodder, insulation, thatching or biofuel. There are many images on Geograph of straw bales wrongly described as hay. This is possibly due to the modern generation's lack of connection with its agricultural heritage. See FODDER & OTHER CROPS below
J4870 : Straw bales near Scrabo by Rossographer
Rolled straw bales beneath Scrabo Tower between Comber and Newtownards.
by Rossographer

SO8133 : Straw bales and Pendock Church by Philip Halling
Round straw bales in a field beside Pendock church.
by Philip Halling

SO8246 : Stack of straw bales by Philip Halling
Stack of straw bales in a field near Madresfield.
by Philip Halling

SU7818 : Bale stack by Ian Capper
A farmworker collecting a straw bale from a trailer for transfer to a bale stack on a newly harvested field below Main Down.
by Ian Capper

NO0020 : Tele handler at work by Dave Fergusson
Loading straw bales at Findo Gask.
by Dave Fergusson

SE8830 : Straw Bales by Roger Gilbertson
A few miles further North, David Hockney painted a watercolour picture of Straw Bales in his series on the Yorkshire Wolds.
by Roger Gilbertson

SO6093 : Straw stack near Weston in Shropshire by Roger  Kidd
Looking north-east, this freshly planted wheat(?) field is by the B4368 north of Upper Netchwood. The underlying Triassic red sandstone governs the colour of the soil here.
The stack of straw bales was about thirty metres long and nearly eight metres high.
by Roger Kidd

SO8040 : An early baler at Welland Steam Rally by Philip Halling
An early baler baling straw at Welland Steam Rally.
by Philip Halling
Shared Description

TG3005 : A baler at work by Evelyn Simak
A new round bale of straw has just been released from the baler. See also > LinkExternal link.
by Evelyn Simak

NS6598 : Square Baler In Action Near Poldar Moss by James T M Towill
A Claas Markant square baler at work in a field bordering Poldar Moss.
by James T M Towill

NT7572 : Fendt Tractor and Massey Ferguson 2170 Baler at Birnieknowes by Jennifer Petrie
The wheat has been harvested and the baler makes the straw bales. The North Sea is in the distance.
by Jennifer Petrie


ROOTS, TUBERS, BULBS & OTHER VEGETABLES

POTATOES
NO2021 : Potato field at Hawkstane by M J Richardson
Looking northwest to Glencarse Hill. The potato tops have been removed, to reduce the risk of blight in the tubers, and the cereals beyond have been harvested.
by M J Richardson

NF6970 : Potato patch in the machair by M J Richardson
At Balranald, an RSPB reserve.
by M J Richardson

NT5479 : Potatoes at Betony Bridge by M J Richardson
With irrigation pipes at the ready.
by M J Richardson

SE9916 : Potato Harvesting near Saxby All Saints by David Wright
September 2014 has been drier than normal in North Lincolnshire which has meant good conditions for the potato harvest.
by David Wright

NO6654 : Maris Peer potatoes by Adrian Diack
This photo shows a crop of purple flowering Maris Peer potatoes growing in a field near Westerton. Maris Peer is a small, salad potato which is suitable for boiling or making into chips.
by Adrian Diack

NO4016 : Potato field, Dairsie Mains by Maigheach-gheal
Vast areas of Fife's farmland is used for growing potatoes and other vegetables. Here the potatoes are waiting to be harvested.
by Maigheach-gheal

SE4479 : North  Park  Farm  over  potato  field by Martin Dawes
The potatoes have been sprayed to kill the tops off prior to being lifted
by Martin Dawes


RED BEET & SUGAR BEET
SE7169 : Flamingo variety by Pauline E
Colourful beets in the vegetable plots in the Castle Howard walled garden add a splash of pink. The produce supplies the Courtyard Café and the Farm Shop.
by Pauline E

NJ3153 : Harvesting by Anne Burgess
This machinery was being used to harvest a field of beetroot on the Haugh of Orton. There were one machine (not in shot) stripping the tops off the beets, a second one (drawn by the blue tractor) lifting them, and two tractors with bogeys taking the beets to storage.
by Anne Burgess

TL5573 : Sugar Beet plant by Hugh Venables
Sugar Beet is harvested from September through until March to provide a steady supply for the processing plants.
by Hugh Venables

TM0632 : Sugar beet by N Chadwick
Shared Description

TF0153 : Harvesting sugar beet by Richard Croft
Sugar beet harvester and tractor seen from Warren Lane
by Richard Croft

SE5919 : Bolting sugar beet by Jonathan Thacker
Sugar beet is generally bred so that it doesn't bolt. In its first year it produces the root which is harvested for its sugar content. Some beet is retained for a second year in which it will flower (bolt) and produce seed. Sometimes however it will bolt in its first year, usually due to unusual weather conditions. The recent sustained above average temperatures might be sufficient to induce bolting but it would only be seen in a few plants and not a whole field like this. I therefore conclude that this field is being grown for seed. Otherwise there will be a very unhappy farmer who will see the sugar yield from his crop dramatically reduced as a result of the plants putting all their energy into producing seed rather than sugar laden roots..
by Jonathan Thacker

SO8732 : Sugar beet by Philip Halling
Harvested sugar beet crop at Home Farm, Forthampton.
by Philip Halling


JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES - a tuber forming sunflower; great for winter soups, slightly spicy [and renowned for a capacity to produce wind - the carbohydrate they contain is inulin, not starch]
SO8739 : A crop of Jerusalem artichoke by Philip Halling
A crop of Jerusalem artichoke growing in a field beside a road in Ripple.
by Philip Halling

SO8739 : A crop of Jerusalem artichoke by Philip Halling
A crop of Jerusalem artichoke growing in a field beside a road in Ripple.
by Philip Halling

SK8743 : Jerusalem artichokes by Jonathan Thacker
Helianthus tuberosus
Grown as food and cover for pheasants.
by Jonathan Thacker


ASPARAGUS
SO8350 : Asparagus in a field at Callow End by Philip Halling
A field of asparagus, now beyond the harvest season the shoots are allowed to grow.
by Philip Halling

SO8578 : Asparagus growing in field, near Kidderminster by P L Chadwick
Last year this field adjacent to Hurcott Wood was growing potatoes. This year the crop appears to be asparagus, but because this is the crop's first year it may be it has not been cut as the field is being established.

SO8578 : Asparagus growing in field - close-up, near Kidderminster.

SO8578 : Potato plants growing adjacent to Hurcott Wood, near Kidderminster.
by P L Chadwick

TG1822 : Asparagus plants by Evelyn Simak
The probably best known member of the family of Asparagaceae is the edible variety called Asparagus officinalis, commonly referred to as asparagus. The word asparagus derives from Latin, and the plant was once known in English as sperage, a term that originates from the Greek aspharagos or asparagos, which in turn is derived from the Persian word asparag, meaning "sprout" or "shoot."

Asparagus has been used from very early times as a vegetable as well as a medicinal plant.

For more information see LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak

SO9142 : Field of asparagus by Philip Halling
After the end of June the asparagus spears are no longer cut and they are allowed to grow, by autumn this is how they look. Bredon Hill is in the background.
by Philip Halling

SO9042 : Asparagus crop, near Defford by Philip Halling
Asparagus spears are cut regularly until the end of the season on 21 June when the remaining spears are left to grow and replenish the roots.
by Philip Halling


LEEKS
NT4983 : Leeks at Gullane by M J Richardson
With new grass or winter cereal beyond.
by M J Richardson


NT6180 : Leeks and a shelterbelt by M J Richardson
By Limetrees Walk at Tyninghame
by M J Richardson


ONION & GARLIC
SO8445 : Field of onions by Philip Halling
Field of onions near Sheepcote Farm near Clifton.
by Philip Halling

SP0651 : Field of onions by Philip Halling
Field of onions at Salford Priors.
by Philip Halling

SO8448 : A field of onions by Philip Halling
A field of onions near Kempsey. Coaches can be seen on the far side of the field having brought seasonal pickers to harvest this crop of onions.
by Philip Halling

TG1124 : Onions (Allium cepa) by Evelyn Simak
Onions are members of the Liliaceae family. Onions are known to have been grown in ancient Egypt and in Rome, where they were known as unio, the Latin word for pearl. The word became unyon in Middle English. The status of the onion rose after French Onion Soup was made popular by Stanislaus I, the former King of Poland.

Salle Hall > LinkExternal link was built in 1761 for Edward Hase; alterations were made in 1862, and east and west service blocks were added in 1910 for Sir Woolmer White. The east wing contains an Orangery > LinkExternal link. (N. Pevsner & B. Wilson, The Buildings of England, Norfolk 1: Norwich and North-East, 2002). Presently, Salle Hall and gardens are part of the Salle Park Estate, owned by Sir John White. Salle Park gardens consist of two sections, one of which being a Georgian style pleasure garden with formal lawns and topiary, rose gardens, specimen trees and shrubs > LinkExternal link - LinkExternal link . The walled kitchen garden was created in the 1780s and retains many of the original features.
by Evelyn Simak

SD4514 : Western corner of a field of garlic, Burscough Moss by Christine Johnstone
The only garlic field in sight.
by Christine Johnstone

SD4513 : Field of garlic, west of Springwell Farm by Christine Johnstone
Planted in parallel rows and square blocks, ignoring the irregular shape of the field.
by Christine Johnstone

TQ2754 : Garlic at Fanny's Farm Shop by Peter Trimming
Hanging garlic, and shallots, just inside the entrance to Fanny's Farm Shop, Merstham, Surrey.
by Peter Trimming


CARROTS
SE6325 : Field of carrots near Rosehill Farm by Jonathan Thacker
The light soils here are ideal for carrots but with recent very heavy rainfall I doubt if the irrigation pipes on the right will see much use this year.
by Jonathan Thacker

TF6612 : Oh, carrots! by Ben Harris
At least, I think they're carrots.
by Ben Harris


PARSNIPS

CELERY
TL5476 : G's Celery by Richard Humphrey
Looking over a field of celery from the bank of Soham Lode near Barway. G's have a very large processing and packing factory in Barway
by Richard Humphrey

TL5372 : Rows of celery near Dimmock's Cote by Richard Humphrey
The black peat soil in the southern fens of Cambridgeshire is ideal for growing celery.
by Richard Humphrey

X1976 : Coastal Crop by kevin higgins
A field of celery overlooks the sea near Ardmore.
by kevin higgins


BRASSICAS

CABBAGES, BRUSSELS SPROUTS, BROCCOLI etc.
SW9177 : Cauliflower, Tregirls Farm by David Hawgood
By the coastal path was a large field of cauliflowers, just being picked.
by David Hawgood

TF3339 : Field of cauliflowers east of Frampton by Richard Humphrey
The cranes of Boston docks are on the horizon
by Richard Humphrey

SW8531 : Field of young cauliflower at Place Barton. by Rod Allday
Cauliflower are known as broccoli in Cornwall and are a major crop locally. In the centre of the picture can be seen Black Rock SW8331 : Black Rock at the entrance to Carrick Roads, with Pendennis Head behind.
by Rod Allday

SW6240 : Field of Broccoli seedlings at Kehelland by Rod Allday
'Broccoli' is used to refer to cauliflower in Cornwall.
by Rod Allday

NO4605 : Yellow flowering purple broccoli by James Allan
A field of broccoli growing north of Sprattyhall farm.
by James Allan

SO5922 : Purple Sprouting Broccoli by Jonathan Billinger
The tastiest vegetable on the allotment in early spring.
by Jonathan Billinger

TF4249 : Harvesting purple sprouting broccoli by Neil Theasby
At Leake Hurn's End
by Neil Theasby

NT5179 : Christmas lunch 2011 by M J Richardson
Newly planted Brussels Sprouts at Muirton.
by M J Richardson

NT6177 : Brussels Sprouts by M J Richardson
A good field of the lovely vegetable.
by M J Richardson

TG2802 : A field of Brussels sprouts by Evelyn Simak
Cabbage is one of several cole crops, known as 'caulis' by the Romans and 'kaulion' by the Greeks. The cole family includes cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, collards, kohlrabi, and Brussels sprouts. Cabbages and kale were the first of the cole crops to be domesticated, presumably about 2,000 years ago, and are believed to originate from Western Europe whereas Brussels sprouts came into existence less than 500 years ago. Wild cole crops can be found growing along the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts of Europe. The vegetables depicted here are grown for the farm shop of nearby Church Farm.
by Evelyn Simak

SO5922 : Brussels Sprout, 'Marte' by Jonathan Billinger
An early-maturing variety, pictured in early November.
by Jonathan Billinger

TG2802 : Vegetables in a field by Church Farm by Evelyn Simak
Rows of red cabbage alternate with rows of red kale. Cabbage is one of several cole crops, known as 'caulis' by the Romans and 'kaulion' by the Greeks. The cole family includes cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, collards, kohlrabi, and Brussels sprouts. Cabbages and kale were the first of the cole crops to be domesticated, presumably about 2,000 years ago, and are believed to originate from Western Europe whereas Brussels sprouts came into existence less than 500 years ago. Wild cole crops can be found growing along the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts of Europe. The vegetables depicted here are grown for the farm shop of nearby Church Farm.
by Evelyn Simak

TG2802 : Savoy cabbage in a field in Framingham Earl by Evelyn Simak
Savoy cabbage has a milder, mellower flavour than regular cabbage and was first recorded from the region of Savoy, France, in the mid 1500s, hence its name. The region at the time was, however, not French but ruled by the Italian House of Savoy.

Cabbage is one of several cole crops, known as 'caulis' by the Romans and 'kaulion' by the Greeks. The cole family includes cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, kale, collards, kohlrabi, and Brussels sprouts. Cabbages and kale were the first of the cole crops to be domesticated, presumably about 2,000 years ago, and are believed to originate from Western Europe whereas Brussels sprouts came into existence less than 500 years ago. Wild cole crops can be found growing along the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts of Europe. The vegetables depicted here are grown for the farm shop of nearby Church Farm.
by Evelyn Simak


RAPE
NT0985 : Oil-seed Rape near Wester Gellet by M J Richardson
Just coming into flower.
by M J Richardson

NT4370 : Farmland flowers at Wintonhill by M J Richardson
A crop of oilseed rape, with poppies and shepherd's purse.
by M J Richardson

NT5674 : Oilseed rape flowers by M J Richardson
The crop in full bloom near Traprain Law.
by M J Richardson

NT5674 : Oilseed Rape near Traprain Law by M J Richardson
A common sight in East Lothian in spring.
by M J Richardson

NT4370 : Goldfield at Wintonhill by M J Richardson
Oilseed rape in full flower, with the Lammermuir Hills in the distance.
by M J Richardson

NT4966 : One of the East Lothian spring colours by M J Richardson
Oilseed rape - the other is green, mostly winter barley.
by M J Richardson

NT5568 : Oilseed Rape at Townhead by M J Richardson
Ripening seed pods in a crop that has flowered NT5568 : Oilseed Rape at Townhead.
by M J Richardson

NT6275 : Oilseed rape ready for harvest by M J Richardson
Looking north towards Biel Mill. For a close-up see NT6275 : Oilseed Rape - detail. Six days later and the crop has been harvested and baled NT6275 : Oilseed rape harvested and baled.
by M J Richardson


SWEDE, TURNIP & KALE
NZ2185 : Swede crop by Graham Robson
A crop of swedes growing in an arable field to the north of Hepscott Red House.
by Graham Robson

NT1145 : Sheep feeding on Shaw Hill by M J Richardson
Slowly working their way through swedes or similar root crop. Birch woodland is developing on the top of the hill.
by M J Richardson

NJ7055 : Swedes under netting to control Cabbage Root Fly by David Hawgood
I stopped to photograph this netting because I was not familiar with the use of textile covers like this over root crops. The farmer told us that it is used to control Cabbage Root Fly in swedes. I found more information from Scottish Agricultural College LinkExternal link which tells us: "Lightweight fleece textile covers were originally developed to advance maturity of vegetable crops. For organic growers they have the additional benefit of excluding air borne pests. Durable nettingcovers were specifically developed for pest control. They have been adopted on a large scale bygrowers of culinary swede to meet a dearth of synthetic pesticides for cabbage root fly." One supplier is Wondermesh LinkExternal link .
by David Hawgood

SO7597 : A stubble turnip in Shropshire by Roger  Kidd
Growing here through the winter has been a crop of animal grade turnips - known as stubble turnips. These grow rapidly after being sown directly among the stubble following summer corn harvests. At the end of the winter, sheep are enjoying these at the north end of the field.
SO7597 : Crop field and footpath from Cranmere near Worfield, Shropshire
by Roger Kidd

SO7597 : Footpath and cropfield north of Worfield, Shropshire by Roger  Kidd
The cereal field to the right has been partly planted with turnips which have grown during the autumn and winter and are now available for sheep to eat.

Stubble turnips: these grow rapidly after being sown directly among the stubble following summer corn harvests. At the end of the winter, sheep are enjoying these at the north end of the field. Only part of the field has been planted with these turnips. The rest has already been partly prepared for this years cereal sowing, which I assume has not yet taken place because the sheep have free access.
SO7597 : A stubble turnip in Shropshire
by Roger Kidd

TG0813 : Stubble turnips by Evelyn Simak
Stubble turnips are a popular forage crop and suitable for sheep as well as cattle. They are sown approximately 12 to 14 weeks before they are utilised. For a wider view of this location see > LinkExternal link.
by Evelyn Simak

NH5654 : Sheep in the turnips, Black Isle by Julian Paren
Part of the winter scene on the Black Isle are fields of turnips with sheep often staying overwinter and which will be returned to the West Coast later in the spring. See February 2016 very nearby NH5653 : Sheep and root crops by Newton of Ferintosh, Black Isle
by Julian Paren

NY4341 : Farmland, Hesket by Andrew Smith
Sheep and turnips with Skiddaw, Carrock Fell and High Pike in the background (from left to right).
by Andrew Smith

NO2103 : Winter fodder by Richard Webb
Kale and turnips grown for winter feed for sheep. Soon this will be a mudbath full of half eaten turnips.
by Richard Webb

NO4520 : Harvesting at Leuchars by Scott Cormie
Harvesting turnips to the south of Leuchars, with the station in the background.
by Scott Cormie

NT8862 : Protected crop near Blackhill by M J Richardson
A crop of Swedes covered with a plastic mesh NT8862 : Protected crop at Blackhill, for protection against pigeons [?].
by M J Richardson


PEAS, BEANS etc.

PEAS
NT5666 : Peas near Newlands - detail by M J Richardson
Not the sort of crop I would expect to find at 205m elevation in the Lammermuir 'foothills'. They were very small, but vigorous plants that looked as if they might have been sown not long ago, and a long way from flowering and producing peas. For a wider view see NT5666 : Peas near Newlands.
Enquiries have established that this is indeed a crop being grown as 'garden peas', and is expected to be ready for harvest in early September. Some crops are grown as high as 300m a.s.l. Thanks to Richard Byass, LinkExternal link for this information.
by M J Richardson

NT5666 : Peas near Newlands by M J Richardson
Not the sort of crop I would expect to find at 205m elevation in the Lammermuir 'foothills'. They were very small, but vigorous plants that looked as if they might have been sown not long ago, and a long way from flowering and producing peas. For detail see NT5666 : Peas near Newlands - detail.
Enquiries have established that this is indeed a crop being grown as 'garden peas', and is expected to be ready for harvest in early September. Some crops are grown as high as 300m a.s.l. Thanks to Richard Byass, LinkExternal link for this information.
by M J Richardson

NT7472 : Peaviner working for SBP at Birnieknowes by Jennifer Petrie
SBP Scottish Borders Produce Ltd is a well-established growers co-operative. It was set up in 1972 by 5 farmers growing a few hundred tonnes but now has more than 30 farmers growing 30,000 tonnes of vining peas. All the growers lie within 30 miles of the freezing plant in Eyemouth. They are mostly grown in the Borders, East Lothian and north Northumberland. LinkExternal link
by Jennifer Petrie

NT7472 : A Handful of Peavined Chaff by Jennifer Petrie
After the peas are harvested by the viner the stems and leaves drop out of the back. Later this will be ploughed back into the soil for nourishment.
by Jennifer Petrie

NT7572 : Peas at Birnieknowes grown by SBP by Jennifer Petrie
Scottish Borders Produce, SBP, grew and harvested 7 fields of peas this year at Birnieknowes. They were taken to their freezer plant at Eyemouth and will later be sold at Aldi, Morrisons and probably also in Asda. SBP try to freeze 200 tonnes of peas every 24 hours. LinkExternal link
by Jennifer Petrie

NT7472 : SBP Harvesting Peas at Birnieknowes by Jennifer Petrie
Yet another load of peas is tipped into the waiting trailer. LinkExternal link
by Jennifer Petrie

SO7740 : Footpath through a field of peas by Philip Halling
Footpath through a field of peas at Little Malvern.
by Philip Halling

SO7740 : Field of dry peas by Philip Halling
A field of desiccated peas at Little Malvern.
by Philip Halling


BROAD BEANS, FAVA BEANS
NT2769 : Broad Beans at Liberton by M J Richardson
A revisit to this crop of beans [Vicia faba sub.sp. minor] 6½ weeks after NT2769 : Field beans at Liberton. They have come on well and are just starting to flower.
by M J Richardson

SO8845 : Field of broad beans by Philip Halling
A crop of broad beans in a field next to Croome Park.
by Philip Halling

SP2136 : Fava or field beans by Philip Halling
Fava or field beans in a field beside a country road near Aston Magna.
by Philip Halling

NT2769 : Broad Beans at Liberton by M J Richardson
A revisit to this crop of beans [Vicia faba sub.sp. minor] 6½ weeks after NT2769 : Field beans at Liberton. They have come on well and are just starting to flower.
by M J Richardson

TM0733 : Field Beans by M J Richardson
The crop in this field, just by the visitor centre at Flatford, appears to have been field beans, but not very well grown and with small pods with few seeds, presumably a victim of the 2007 growing season.
by M J Richardson

SU1777 : Broad beans, near Draycot Foliat by Brian Robert Marshall
Looks like there will be a bumper crop of these well-known legumes. Can't abide them myself. I much prefer runners.
by Brian Robert Marshall

NT8563 : Field Beans at Lemington by M J Richardson
Field Beans ready for harvest, with a pod opened up to show the seeds, which are smaller than those of the Broad Beans used for human food. [There were originally four seeds but two fell out.].
by M J Richardson


RUNNER BEANS
SO8545 : Stick bean canes, Sandford Villa Farm by Philip Halling
Stick bean canes with young runner beans growing at their base at Sandford Villa Farm.
by Philip Halling

SO7434 : Runner beans by Philip Halling
A field of stick or runner beans near Bromesberrow Heath.
by Philip Halling

NJ2370 : Cabbage and French Beans by Des Colhoun
A Cabbage White feasts from the flower nectar of a runner bean. This specimen is a female and is recognised by the black spots on her wings which are absent on the male wings. Robert Graves' description of the Cabbage White is immortalised thus:-

FLYING CROOKED
The butterfly, a cabbage-white,
(His honest idiocy of flight)
Will never now, it is too late,
Master the art of flying straight,
Yet has- who knows so well as I?-
A just sense of how not to fly:
He lurches here and here by guess
And God and hope and hopelessness.
Even the acrobatic swift
Has not his flying-crooked gift
by Des Colhoun

ST6600 : Healthy Beans, Cerne Abbas by Des Blenkinsopp
After all the rain we've had this year everything's looking pretty lush.
Allotments south of Cerne Abbas, looking towards Dickley Hill.
by Des Blenkinsopp

SU5112 : Runner Bean crop at Marks Farm, Botley by Peter Facey
The bean pickers were Polish.
by Peter Facey


CUCURBITS - Marrows, courgettes, squash, pumpkin, gourds and cucumber

SW5833 : Fields of marrows at Mably by Sheila Russell
The building in the distance is the Country Skittle Park.
by Sheila Russell

TQ4969 : Courgette Picking in Upper Ruxley by David Anstiss
As seen from a byway from the B2173 Maidstone Road towards Birchwood Road.
The Maidstone Road is seen in the background.

The farm trailer has a small conveyor belt taking the picked vegetables from the three pickers into the trailer.
by David Anstiss

SO9249 : Market gardening at Drakes Broughton by Philip Halling
A field of courgettes near Drakes Broughton
by Philip Halling

TF2733 : Crop field near Ivy House Farm by JThomas
Looks like squash plants of some sort.
by JThomas

TG1124 : Section of the walled kitchen garden by Evelyn Simak
The yellow fruit seen growing in the foreground are squashes, the fruits of various climbing plants in the Cucurbitaceae (cucumber) family, most of which originated in the tropics. More familiar plants in the same family are melons (Cucumis melo), squashes, pumpkins and marrows. They are among the earliest cultivated plants, as they are of considerable value as sources of food, and for making utensils and ornaments. LinkExternal link

Salle Hall > LinkExternal link was built in 1761 for Edward Hase; alterations were made in 1862, and east and west service blocks were added in 1910 for Sir Woolmer White. The east wing contains an Orangery > LinkExternal link. (N. Pevsner & B. Wilson, The Buildings of England, Norfolk 1: Norwich and North-East, 2002). Presently, Salle Hall and gardens are part of the Salle Park Estate, owned by Sir John White. Salle Park gardens consist of two sections, one of which being a Georgian style pleasure garden with formal lawns and topiary, rose gardens, specimen trees and shrubs > LinkExternal link - LinkExternal link . The walled kitchen garden was created in the 1780s and retains many of the original features.
by Evelyn Simak

TF4703 : Pumpkins for Halloween? by Richard Humphrey
A crop of pumpkins off Laddus Drove, Friday Bridge presumably being grown to meet the ever increasing demand for Halloween merchandise which retailers have increasingly hyped up over the last few years LinkExternal link
by Richard Humphrey

SO6023 : Cucumbers grow well here by Jonathan Billinger
In this warm summer, cucumbers do particularly well under glass.
by Jonathan Billinger


FODDER & COVER CROPS - grass, hay, silage, turf, clover etc.

GRASS - More than half of the croppable land in the UK is 'just grass'; some is permanent, some is temporary, and a lot is classified as 'rough grazing'. Grass is a multipurpose but complex crop. As well as direct grazing for cattle and sheep, it is harvested for winter storage, either dried as hay or made into silage [by fermentation with additives]. It is not always possible to be certain if a mown field is being cut for hay or silage. It may also be mixed with clover or lucerne. It may be sown directly or undersown in a cereal crop, to establish a new pasture after the cereal harvest. It is also sown to provide turf for gardens etc. Haystacks are made of cut, dried grass - there are many wrongly-described 'haystacks' on Geograph which are actually straw bales [see above in the HARVEST section of CEREALS].
SE7387 : Grass crop drying in the hot September sunshine by Pauline E
With the temperature at an unseasonable 24 degrees C, a grass crop dries out on the hillside south of Appleton-le-Moors.
by Pauline E

NT2452 : Harvested barley field at Nether Falla by M J Richardson
With the undersown grass well established. For earlier views of this 'repasturing' see NT2452 : Barley field at Nether Falla and links therein.
by M J Richardson
Shared Description

SE7098 : Baling hay, Rosedale by Christopher Hall
Looking down from Rosedale East Mines to Stables Farm. the grass crop in the closer field is being made into round bales whilst in the background in front of Florence Terrace another tractor is cutting the grass crop.
by Christopher Hall

SP1967 : Tedding the grass crop near Lowsonford in Warwickshire by Roger  Kidd
Near the large house known as Sandhills. Telephoto assisted image.

The tractor is pulling a tedder which tosses and separates the cut grass which sometimes settles too much after mowing. The resulting extra aeration speeds up the drying to improve haymaking. The rain lashed down again within two minutes of this image being taken!
by Roger Kidd

NN5809 : Grass crop in Strathyre by M J Richardson
Grazing or Hay/silage? Forestry beyond and the valley of the Anie Burn.
by M J Richardson

SO8742 : A silage cut by Philip Halling
The grass on the Glebe field has been cut for a silage crop. St Nicholas' church can be seen in the background.
by Philip Halling

SO8742 : Haylage bales, Earl's Croome by Philip Halling
When wrapped these bales are no different to silage, however, haylage is left longer to dry than silage. As a result it is drier than silage, but not as dry as hay. Earl's Croome church is in the background.
by Philip Halling

NY4124 : Grass baling in valley between Great Mell Fell and Little Mell Fell by Trevor Littlewood
The flat, poorly drained valley bottom is mainly rough grazing - virtually moorland. Two fields however have produced a grass crop which has been baled, presumably as silage.
by Trevor Littlewood

HY2726 : Cropped field above the Loch of Boardhouse by Gordon Hatton
A cropped grass field above the loch. Grass is the one crop that thrives on Orkney thanks to reasonable soils and adequate rainfall. The crop is destined for the beef cattle which are common on Orkney.
by Gordon Hatton

NU1718 : Silage 'sausages' by Russel Wills
Silage is fermented and stored in a silo or, as here, in a tube before being used as food.
Hay is mowed, dried and stored in bales. Silage is compacted and stored in air-tight conditions without being dried.
by Russel Wills

SO6380 : Silage making by Philip Halling
At this time of year it can be difficult to be sure whether cut grass is for hay or silage making, almost certainly this is silage making as the grass has been raked into large rows ready for the baler. If this were to be baled for hay it would dry and not green.
by Philip Halling

SO7057 : Baled hay by Philip Halling
Baled hay in a field at Whitbourne.
by Philip Halling

NU0111 : Silage clamp by Russel Wills
At Unthank Farm.
by Russel Wills

TM1416 : Hay by Glyn Baker
Hay on Earls Hall Farm
by Glyn Baker

NF7536 : Haystack, Tobha Mòr by Richard Webb
Fodder is still required well into the Spring, and the stack survived the winter with the aid of an old bit of netting.
by Richard Webb

ST0837 : Combe Cross Cottage, 1949 by David M Murray-Rust
17th century thatched cottage with rough-stone walling, since restored and extended Link . Listed Grade II. Note the traditional thatched haystack on the right.
by David M Murray-Rust
Shared Descriptions

NB3811 : Traditional Hebridean haystacks by Tom Richardson
Notice how the hay does not touch the ground
by Tom Richardson


HU3790 : Traditional Haystacks by Graeme Smith
Some good old fashioned haystacks at Isbister
by Graeme Smith

ST9095 : Field of grass Tetbury Common by Nigel Mykura
This field of grass appeared ready for cutting. It is just south of a minor road that leads west from the A433 north east of Tetbury.
by Nigel Mykura

NZ3627 : Grass field at Neasless Farm by Graham Robson
A grass field beside the track leading to Neasless Farm. The field has recently had a crop of grass removed.
by Graham Robson

SO8546 : Field growing lawn turf, Kerswell Green by Philip Halling
Large field growing turf at Kerswell Green, this land has been used for this purpose for some years, each crop of turf removing a thin slice of top soil.
by Philip Halling

NZ3149 : Turf field by Trevor Littlewood
The land is owned or at least managed by a company, Durham Turf; the nature of the turf harvesting is obvious in the image which was recorded along Black Boy Road, looking near to south.
To the left is an old railway route, the Leamside Line.
by Trevor Littlewood

NT6081 : Grass field with irrigation equipment by M J Richardson
Turf was being harvested nearby.
by M J Richardson

SP1169 : Turf lifted, rolled, and stacked on pallets, Forde Hall by Robin Stott
Turf is susceptible to drying out once rolled and may need to be watered or covered in a plastic sheet.
by Robin Stott


COVER CROPS are grown for variety of reasons:- to provide temporary ground cover between crops; to provide game cover; to provide green organic matter that can be ploughed in to improve soil structure and may be nitrogen fixing plants or selected to add specific minerals; or headlands sown with wildflower mixtures to promote biodiversity.
NT8662 : Radish and Buckwheat at Lemington by M J Richardson
The ground cover crop at NT8662 : Fodder Radish at Lemington, the Radish has pale four-petalled flowers, and the Buckwheat has pale pinkish clusters of smaller flowers.
by M J Richardson

NT5350 : Phacelia in Lauderdale by M J Richardson
An increasingly frequent, and attractive, crop grown as a cover crop to attract bees and other pollinators, and to be ploughed in as a green manure, and also to suppress weeds. Here it is growing with another plant, a Polygonum, with creamy pink flowers which I have not yet identified. Update, 2 days later - it is Buckwheat, Fagopyrum esculentum, which produces edible seeds but these will not be harvested - it improves the availability of phosphorus LinkExternal link.
by M J Richardson

SO8255 : Cover crop at Temple Laugherne Farm by Jonathan Billinger
The unusual sight of a flowering crop at the end of November leads me to suspect that this is a green manure crop designed to aid fertility in an organic system.
by Jonathan Billinger

SU0626 : Game Crops on Netton Down by Maigheach-gheal
Among the most common cover crops are kale, maize, quinoa, sunflowers and canary grass. Cover strips often contain a mixture of these species. They provide rich feeding for songbirds as well as game, and particular mixes of plants are now produced specifically to benefit songbirds, notably in the winter when losses through starvation tend to be high.
by Maigheach-gheal


CLOVER & LUCERNE/ALFALFA
ST5110 : Red  Clover  - Pendomer by Sarah Smith
This is a Red Clover and grass crop which will be made into silage and put with the rest of the fermenting grass in the silage clamp for winter feed.
Red Clover is high in protein as a foodstuff but must be fed carefully to livestock as they suffer from bloat if eaten fresh and in large quantities. The nitrogen from the root nodules will be beneficial to the soil for up to three years after the crop has been ploughed up in rotation and so the farmer will need to apply less nitrogen fertiliser in this field during that time - if at all.
by Sarah Smith

TF1276 : Walking through a field of alfalfa by Chris Morgan
This path left clear of crops to make for an easy walk through the colourful flowers.
by Chris Morgan

TG3104 : Lucerne  (Medicago sativa) by Evelyn Simak
Lucerne, also known as Alfalfa, is a forage legume producing high quality green feed and is commonly used as a premium food for horses. Native to the Middle-East but long since naturalised worldwide, it is extremely rich in minerals, and can also be safely consumed by humans. Alfalfa sprouts, leaves and young stems can be eaten either raw in salads or cooked. The roots of the Lucerne plant can go up to 30 foot into the soil, giving it the ability to draw minerals up from the deep layers of the ground.
by Evelyn Simak


GLASSHOUSE & SALADS

SO6023 : Oh Happy Day! by Jonathan Billinger
This is the unusual name of the tomato variety in the image.
by Jonathan Billinger

NJ3459 : Tomatoes by Anne Burgess
An exceptionally fine truss of tomatoes in one of the glasshouses in the Walled Garden.
by Anne Burgess

NJ3459 : Red Peppers by Anne Burgess
Almost ready to be harvested and included in the menu in the garden's restaurant.
by Anne Burgess

SO9343 : Field of lettuce, Birlingham by Philip Halling
Acres of lettuce near Hall Farm, Birlingham. This is a fairly typical scene in this area with Birlingham being on periphery of the Vale of Evesham, an area famous for its market gardening. Bredon Hill is in the background.
by Philip Halling

TR3459 : Rows of baby lettuce by Nick Smith
Different varieties of lettuce in nursery beds
by Nick Smith

TL6895 : Lettuce harvest, Methwold Common, Norfolk by Rodney Burton
Harvesting lettuce in the 'Black Fen' west of Methwold, Norfolk; the tall poplar windbreak on the left helps to reduce wind erosion on these light peat soils.
by Rodney Burton

TQ6657 : Endives, near Offham by Paul Harrop
Seen from the public footpath running north east from the village. The surrounding fields were mostly given over to large swathes of endive plants like these, which appeared to have had their top growth harvested.
by Paul Harrop


SOFT FRUIT

NT6430 : Border Berries at Rutherford Farm by Walter Baxter
Two large fields on the south side of the main farm buildings are used during the summer months as a pick your own fruit farm. The main fruits are strawberries, raspberries, gooseberries, red currants and black currants. On this occasion I was picking strawberries.
by Walter Baxter

NO5403 : Growing strawberries by Richard Sutcliffe
The frames of polytunnels, without their polythene covering at Easter Grangemuir Farm. The farm also grows potatoes, broccoli and cereals.
by Richard Sutcliffe

NH9456 : Raspberry Fields by Anne Burgess
The Moray Firth's climate is ideal for growing soft fruit, and Easter Hardmuir Farm specialises in fruit growing. These rows of rasps are burgeoning with berries ready for picking.
by Anne Burgess

NH9456 : Ripe Raspberries by Anne Burgess
A fine spray of berries, just ready to be picked. I wish the ones in my garden looked as good as these!
by Anne Burgess

SO6023 : Golden Raspberry, Rubus ellipticus by Jonathan Billinger
The plants are of Asian origin but fruit perfectly in UK conditions. They are sweeter than most summer-fruiting red varieties but don't hold for long on the cane.
by Jonathan Billinger

NO1341 : Berry fields, Lethendy by Richard Webb
Rows of raspberries.
by Richard Webb

SP8783 : Dovecote Farm, Newton near Geddington, Northants by nick macneill
Redcurrants are in the foreground with asparagus behind. The farm also has a restaurant and farm shop, seemingly popular with teachers the day we were there.
by nick macneill


ORCHARD FRUIT, OTHER FRUIT & HOPS

APPLES
SX8863 : Cary's Orchard, Cockington by Derek Harper
Thousands of apples lie beneath the trees, apparently destined to rot. But on my next visit three months later [[[6734142]], they seemed to have all been cleared up.
by Derek Harper

SX8863 : Apples, Cockington orchard by Derek Harper
Some of the tens of thousands of apples there must be in this orchard up-valley from Cockington Court. This tree is by the path shown in SX8863 : Cockington orchard.
by Derek Harper

TR1257 : Orchard near Tonford Manor by Chris Heaton
Lines of apple tree passed on a path between Tonford Manor and the A2 Canterbury Bypass.
by Chris Heaton


PEARS
SE5158 : Pears, Beningbrough Hall gardens by Derek Harper
Marie Louise pears ripening temptingly in the walled garden.
by Derek Harper


PLUMS
TR1555 : Plum Orchard on Merton Farm by Glyn Baker
A few weeks from harvest there appears to be a fair crop of plums.
by Glyn Baker

SO6855 : Damson plums by Philip Halling
There is an orchard of damsons at Lower Brockhampton, the trees are absolutely loaded this year. The fruit can be used for jam making or even damson gin.
by Philip Halling


CHERRIES
NT4566 : Wild Cherries by M J Richardson
Detail from a group of cherry trees providing lovely fruit most years. They are on the bank of an old mining railway line from the last century, or even the one before, now part of the Pencaitland Railway Walk.
by M J Richardson

TF0820 : Cherry tree fruit by Bob Harvey
Can I call these Cherries before they are ripe?

A drupe is an indehiscent fruit which has an outer fleshy part, the exocarp, which attracts animals to eat it and spread the seeds. Cherries are the best-known example used in schoolbooks. A plum is a drupe as well, of course.
by Bob Harvey
Shared Description


BLUEBERRIES
NO5136 : Blueberries?  being grown commercially by Val Vannet
In an area which specialises in all sorts of soft fruit, this is a bit of a mystery. There are a couple of large fields planted with bushes about the size of blackcurrant bushes bearing flowers and leaves remininscent of wild bilberries
by Val Vannet

NO5035 : Blueberries by Russel Wills
Some of a fieldful!
by Russel Wills

NO5035 : Field of blueberries at Downieken by Russel Wills
Available on Sundays for 'pick your own'.
For closer view see: LinkExternal link
by Russel Wills


HAZEL & COB NUTS
TF0820 : Hazel Nuts by Bob Harvey
Bourne Woods have a huge number of Hazels, but many of them bear fruit but sparely, as here. These are immature, the shells still soft. If they were to ripen they would go that wonderful pale brown colour like a bleached conker.

They won't. I've been walking my dogs here for 43 years, and have never found a ripe, edible, Hazel Nut. There are a lot of squirrels, and they strip the trees before the nuts are mature.
by Bob Harvey
Shared Description

TQ9856 : Kentish cobnuts, Belmont Gardens by pam fray
Grown in the nuttery. A cobnut is a type of hazelnut traditionally grown in Kent. They are harvested in their green state from mid August and with brown shells and husks by mid October.
by pam fray

TQ9856 : The nuttery, Belmont Gardens by pam fray
South of the kitchen garden, it is planted mainly with Kentish cobnuts. The male flowers are yellow catkins already appearing on the plants. Varieties differ widely in the time they shed pollen, from the New Year until March in the south of England.
by pam fray

TQ8466 : A Nuttery Orchard by David Anstiss
Field of Hazel Trees, possibly Kentish Cobnuts on Hurst Hill.
Close to footpath to A2 London Road, via Gore House.
by David Anstiss


GRAPES
SX8257 : Grapes, Sharpham Vineyard by Derek Harper
A bunch of Madeleine Angevine grapes on the well-drained slopes of the Dart valley.
by Derek Harper

TQ1651 : Grapes at Denbies Vineyard, Dorking, Surrey by Peter Trimming
About the largest bunch of grapes which I saw all morning; beside the entrance road to Denbies Wine Estate.
LinkExternal link
by Peter Trimming

TQ1650 : Grape harvesting at Denbies Vineyard by Ian Capper
A Braud grape harvester at work at Denbies Vineyard, with the winery in the left background. On the skyline is Norbury Park House.
by Ian Capper

TQ1650 : Denbies Vineyard, Dorking, Surrey by Peter Trimming
Ripe black grapes in the early autumn sunshine. Photographed from the broad path in the vineyard.
LinkExternal link
by Peter Trimming


FIGS
NJ3459 : Figs by Anne Burgess
Are these the most northerly outdoor figs in the world? They are ripening against the sun-warmed brick wall of the old walled garden at Gordon Castle.
by Anne Burgess

TG1926 : Fig Tree (Ficus Carica) - detail by Evelyn Simak
The fig is indigenous to Persia, Asia Minor and Syria, but it also grows in the milder parts of Europe, where it is being cultivated in the Mediterranean countries. The fruit of the fig tree, eaten fresh or dried, has been valued from antiquity. For the people of ancient Greece figs were such an important part of their staple diet that it was forbidden by law to export the best fruit from their trees. Dried figs have been found in Pompeii, and Pliny gives details of 29 different varieties known in his day.

For more information see LinkExternal link
by Evelyn Simak


HOPS - Grown on poles about 5 m [16 ft] long, in hop gardens [South of England] or hop yards [West Country; see Link]
SO7251 : Hops hung on the church porch by Philip Halling
Hops hung on the porch of Suckley church.
by Philip Halling

TQ5263 : Hops in the Darent Valley by Marathon
The hops here are viewed from the Darent Valley Path and are supplied to the nearby Hop Shop at Castle Farm - see LinkExternal link
by Marathon

SO5842 : Hop field and railway by Oast House Archive
Looking from Western Beggard Lane bridge.

See more sizes for wider panorama.
by Oast House Archive
Shared Description

SU9247 : Hop Growing, Puttenham by Colin Smith
Puttenham Hop Farm is the only one of its kind in this area where once were many hop gardens. It supplies hops to the Hog's Back Brewery at Tongham.
by Colin Smith

TQ6936 : Hop field by Oast House Archive
A maze of Hop Poles. The hops would have been harvested during September.

The hops are dried in TQ6936 : Oast House
by Oast House Archive
Shared Description

TQ7458 : Hop Picking by Oast House Archive
Demonstrating traditional hop picking at the Hop Festival. Thousands of hop pickers would come to Kent, often from London, during the late summer for the hop picking season. The hops were manually picked each hop from its bine.

Nowadays mechanisation has taken over and the hop bines are taken off and taken as a whole to a machine which would process the hops.
by Oast House Archive
Shared Description


MISCELLANEOUS

RHUBARB - for culinary purposes usually treated as a fruit, but the part used is the leaf stalk [petiole]. The leaf blade is not eaten.
SS9615 : Rhubarb forcing pots by M J Richardson
In the walled garden at Knightshayes Court.
by M J Richardson

SP7705 : Roadside Rhubarb by Des Blenkinsopp
There should be a lot more Rheum rhabarbarum adding panache to our roadside verges.
Eye-catching, stylish and good with custard, which is more than can be said for nettles.
by Des Blenkinsopp


DAFFODILS & TULIPS - both for bulbs and cut flowers
SW7635 : Field of daffodils at Roskrow by Rod Allday
Daffodils have become a very popular crop in west Cornwall in recent years. This colourful display is either due to the plants being grown for a bulb crop, when they are allowed to flower and die back to build up the bulb, or, owing to a late flowering following cold weather early in the year, there has been a glut and it has not been viable to pay the cost of picking them in bud for the cut flower market.
by Rod Allday

SW7630 : Daffodil field at Penwarne by Rod Allday
These may be being grown for bulbs, when the flowers are allowed to blossom and die to build up the bulb. When grown for the flower market the daffodils are picked in tight bud, with no yellow showing at all. This year very cold weather at the beginning of the year delayed the development of the plants and then a spell of warm weather in mid February brought them all on together, causing problems for the farmers owing to a glut and also a shortage of pickers - that may be the case here.
by Rod Allday

TF3338 : Daffodils next to Sandholme Lane by Tim Heaton
The Fens have almost 40% of the English acreage of bulbs and flowers grown in the open (NFU 'Why Farming Matters in the Fens')
by Tim Heaton

NO6771 : Bulb Fields and Little Thornton by Anne Burgess
Rows of daffodils (or narcissi) in full bloom, with Little Thornton beyond, looking towards the foothills of the Grampians.
by Anne Burgess

TF6916 : Tulip bulb farming by Adrian S Pye
The more aesthetically pleasing side of farming.
by Adrian S Pye


SUNFLOWER - grown for oil, seed, and as game cover.
TF2217 : Sunflowers, sunflowers and more sunflowers by Richard Humphrey
An incredible sight on Littleworth Drove north of Deeping St Nicholas.
Sunflowers grown by Vine House Farm for bird food.
Buy on line or from our shop in Deeping St Nicholas, see LinkExternal link
by Richard Humphrey

TF2217 : Sunflowers grown by Vine House Farm for bird food by Richard Humphrey
Buy on line or from our shop in Deeping St Nicholas LinkExternal link
This large field of sunflowers on Littleworth Drove north of Deeping St Nicholas. Littleworth Drove was formerly the A16 but is now the A1175 following the completion of the new A16 between Spalding and Peterborough in 2010
by Richard Humphrey

SU0827 : Sunflowers, Portfield Road by Maigheach-gheal
The sunflowers growing in this field are part of a game crop.

Game crops planted and established in the correct conditions provides excellent cover with an open area underneath for any shoot. Birds will be able to move freely with the additional benefit of the nutritious feed value of the seeds.
by Maigheach-gheal


CANARY GRASS - Phalaris canariensis, grown for bird seed.
SK7152 : Canary grass (Phalaris canariensis) by Alan Murray-Rust
Detail of flower heads, being grown as a seed crop LinkExternal link
by Alan Murray-Rust

TA0137 : Crop to the east of Walkington by Ian S
Canary Grass is grown for the bird seed market.
by Ian S

TA0137 : Crop to the east of Walkington by Ian S
Canary Grass is grown for the bird seed market.
by Ian S


FLAX - grown for seed [linseed], oil and fibre
SE2345 : Flax field off Leathley Lane by Stephen Craven
There seems to have been a revival of flax as a crop in recent years. To the right is a shelter belt of trees around Elm Tree Farm.
by Stephen Craven


PHACELIA - a 'biodiversity' crop, grown along field headlands, and as a green manure
NO6948 : Tansy-leaved Phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia) by Anne Burgess
Phacelia is native to southern North America, and is increasingly being planted for its beneficial properties. It is not only attractive to pollinators, but also to hoverflies, which eat aphids and other pests. The succession of flowers on the long curling flower heads makes for a long flowering period.
by Anne Burgess

TQ2081 : White-tailed bumblebee on purple tansy, Phacelia tanacetifolia by David Hawgood
We scattered a packet of wildflower seeds on a spare patch of garden. The phacelia was much the strongest resulting plant, and attracted bees.
by David Hawgood

NO3710 : Phacelia in Fife by M J Richardson
A field margin sown with Phacelia tanacetifolia, which is frequently grown as a cover or green manure crop, and as a nectar plant to attract bees and other insects to promote biodiversity LinkExternal link. The main crop in the field is leeks.
by M J Richardson


ECHIUM
SP0454 : A field of Echium by Philip Halling
A field of a plant of the Echium genus, probably Echium plantagineum, near Abbots Moreton. The oil that is extracted from this plant is used in cosmetics, food and nutraceuticals to treat high blood pressure, high cholesterol, rheumatioid arthritis and skin conditions such as eczema. The plant is poisonous and can kill horses.
by Philip Halling

SP0454 : A field of Echium by Philip Halling
A field of a plant of the Echium genus, probably Echium plantagineum, near Abbots Moreton. The oil that is extracted from this plant is used in cosmetics, food and nutraceuticals to treat high blood pressure, high cholesterol, rheumatioid arthritis and skin conditions such as eczema. The plant is poisonous and can kill horses.
by Philip Halling

SP0454 : A field of Echium by Philip Halling
A field of a plant of the Echium genus, probably Echium plantagineum, near Abbots Moreton. The oil that is extracted from this plant is used in cosmetics, food and nutraceuticals to treat high blood pressure, high cholesterol, rheumatioid arthritis and skin conditions such as eczema. The plant is poisonous and can kill horses.
by Philip Halling


TEA
NM8441 : Lismore tea plantation by M J Richardson
A small and young plantation of Sencha tea has been established at Balliveolan Croft. The tea plants are interplanted between rows of fruit trees and natural vegetation, and have already produced a small harvest.
by M J Richardson


'INDUSTRIAL' CROPS
BIOMASS - Willow, Miscanthus

NT3763 : Willow coppice by M J Richardson
Short rotation coppice being grown for biomass/biofuel production, which is cut frequently - see earlier images from 2010 in the shared description.
by M J Richardson
Shared Description

NT1335 : The River Tweed at Drumelzier Haugh by M J Richardson
Looking south from the Dreva Road, towards the farm and Vane Law beyond. The main field across the river has a crop of biomass willow - the clear bit containing a standing stone and, apparent on Google Earth, some earthworks. The willow has grown quite a bit since James Towill's picture 18 mo earlier NT1435 : Willow For Biomass, taken from the road on the other side of the field.
by M J Richardson

NT3763 : Stripping the Willow by M J Richardson
A short rotation coppice of willow being cut.
by M J Richardson
Shared Description

SK1714 : Miscanthus gigantea at Alrewas by M J Richardson
A large perennial hybrid grass grown to produce ethanol as biofuel. Here in a field that doubles as an overflow car park for the National Memorial Arboretum when needed.
by M J Richardson
Shared Description

TA0016 : Young Miscanthus by David Wright
The Miscanthus which was planted in this field in March TA0016 : Planting Miscanthus is now about 2ft high.
by David Wright

TA0016 : Cutting Miscanthus near Bonby by David Wright
Miscanthus is harvested for use as a biofuel.
by David Wright

ST5152 : A modern crop- Miscanthus-I think by Dr Duncan Pepper
A fast growing bamboo grass used as a biomass fuel source of energy-a reflection of changing climate and economic pressures on farming.
by Dr Duncan Pepper

SJ7662 : Elephant grass alongside the M6 by Stephen Craven
For the other end of this field see SJ7661 : Elephant grass. A rambler gives an indication of scale of this very tall crop, grown as biofuel.
by Stephen Craven




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