Kilrenny - possibly the East Neuk's oldest settlement

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Creative Commons License Text by Bill Kasman, August 2021 ; This work is dedicated to the Public Domain.
Images are under a separate Creative Commons Licence.


The Village


NO5704 : Kilrenny, Fife by Bill Kasman
This minor road enters the village from the north.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The A917 East Neuk of Fife road sweeps to the right past Kilrenny. The road to the left is known as 'Kilrenny' and gives access to the village as well as continuing further onward past the village.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The A917 East Neuk of Fife road bypasses Kilrenny. The wide pavement to the right of the road is intended for cyclists.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
With bus shelters on both sides of the road - one modern and one not so modern!
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
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NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Seen from just outside the village the road heads towards Anstruther. The houses are in Cellardyke which was previously named 'Lower Kilrenny'.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The road crosses the recently renovated bridge. The turn to the right leads to Kilrenny House, Kilrenny Mill Caravan Park and the village of Cellardyke. It is unsurfaced for most of its length.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The road approaches the village from the direction of Crail.
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NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The bridge over the Kilrenny Burn was repaired and renovated in 2017 Link Prior to that the road here was quite narrow and the bridge was in poor condition. Traffic lights were in place to control traffic.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Speed warning sign on A917 by Bill Kasman
As it enters the village of Kilrenny. These signs give a visual reminder of a vehicles' speed. The vehicle which triggered this sign is well within the speed limit as can be seen from the posted speed limit sign on the lamp post to the left of the image.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The road bridge on the A917 at Kilrenny was repaired and strengthened in 2017. This dated stone marks the year the bridge was originally constructed.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : The A917 at Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The A917 bypasses the village. The turning to the right is Main Street which leads into the heart of the village.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Main Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Looking towards its junction with the A917. Across the junction unmetalled roads lead to Kilrenny House, Kilrenny Mill Caravan Park and Cellardyke. For a view in the opposite direction see this image Link
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Main Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Looking across the A917. For a view in the opposite direction see this image Link
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Unmetalled roads near Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
These two roads leave the A917 at Kilrenny. The one on the left leads to Kilrenny House and the one on the right leads to Kilrenny Mill Caravan Park and Cellardyke.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Steps in Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
These steps from the grass verge of the A917 give access to a narrow passageway which connects Back Dykes to Main Street.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Narrow passageway in Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
At the top of the steps in this image Link this narrow passageway leads straight ahead to Main Street Link and left to Back Dykes LinkExternal link
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Narrow passageway in Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
At the top of the steps in this image Link this narrow passageway gives access to Back Dykes.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Narrow passageway in Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Emerging onto Main Street this is the other end of the narrow passageway in this image Link
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NO5704 : Kilrenny Lea by Bill Kasman
This right turn from Kilrenny (road) is the cul-de-sac of Kilrenny Lea.
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NO5704 : Kilrenny Lea, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
This is the cul-de-sac of Kilrenny Lea.
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NO5704 : Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
From the entrance to the cul-de-sac of Kilrenny Lea we see Kilrenny (road) approaching its junction with the A917.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Advice notice by Bill Kasman
This advice (or is it instructions?) notice was affixed to a post at the entrance to the children's play area in Kilrenny.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Overgrown burn by Bill Kasman
This is the Kilrenny Burn. It is severely overgrown for much of its course through the village.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Recycling bins by Bill Kasman
These recycling bins are in the rough car park which serves Kilrenny's children's play area. The structure in the left background is an old doocot (dovecot) Link
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Parked van by Bill Kasman
In the rough car park which serves Kilrenny's children's play area.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5705 : Children's play area by Bill Kasman
This is part of the rough car park which serves Kilrenny's children's play area. The sign says that vehicles are not allowed to pass but the gate can be opened, presumably to give local authority vehicles access the area for maintenance, etc.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5705 : Children's play area by Bill Kasman
In Kilrenny.
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NO5704 : Main Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
The parish church is on the right. In the distance the building with the white car parked outside it is the church hall.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Main Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Main Street continues past the church hall (on the right). After a few hundred metres it joins with Kilrenny (road).
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Main Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Main Street continues to meet Kilrenny (road).
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NO5704 : Common Road, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
This road leads to the rough car park which serves Kilrenny children's play area and is the location of several recycling bins.
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NO5704 : Kirk Wynd, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
This cul-de-sac leads to a late-17th century footbridge over Kilrenny Burn but it is in a parlous state and access to it is currently blocked. It is on the Buildings At Risk Register for Scotland LinkExternal link
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Routine Row, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
This lane runs between the bottom of Kirk Wynd and Common Road.
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NO5704 : Common Road, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Common Road approaches the rough parking area which serves Kilrenny's children's play area.
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NO5704 : Common Road, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Looking across Main Street. Common Road is on the left but both roads are cul-de-sacs leading only to parking for commercial premises.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Routine Row, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
This lane runs from Common Road to the bottom of Kirk Wynd.
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NO5704 : Common Road, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
Leading to a children's play area and picnic area.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Trades Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
This road runs between Common Road and Kilrenny (road).
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NO5704 : Main Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
As it joins Kilrenny (road).
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Kilrenny (road) by Bill Kasman
The turning to the right is Main Street.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Kilrenny (road) by Bill Kasman
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Steps into field by Bill Kasman
This set of well-worn steps don't actually lead anywhere. Presumably there was once a path on the other side of the wall but I could find no trace of it.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Kilrenny (road) by Bill Kasman
The turning to the left between the stone pillars is the driveway of Rennyhill Farm Lodge. That to the right leads into Rennyhill farmyard.
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NO5704 : Rennyhill Gardens by Bill Kasman
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NO5704 : Blacklaws Crescent by Bill Kasman
Immediately to the right of the two cars a footpath leads to the picnic area and children's play area.
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NO5704 : Path to picnic area by Bill Kasman
From Blacklaws Crescent this path leads to the picnic area and children's play area.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : What is this? by Bill Kasman
This recess in the wall is a bit of a mystery. There was no indication as to its purpose. The building is Rennyhill Farm Lodge.
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by Bill Kasman


NO5704 : Trades Street, Kilrenny by Bill Kasman
This road runs between Kilrenny (road) and Common Road.
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by Bill Kasman


KML

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